Tag Archives: queermance

Homecoming: A Talbott & Burns Mystery – now available!

HomecomingI am excited and delighted to announce that my first short M/M erotic romance, Homecoming, has just been released as an e-book by Clan Destine Press’s Encounters imprint. There are currently two more in the series scheduled, and when I have a moment I’ll be writing some more for these boys!

The story’s been launched just ahead of this weekend’s Queermance Festival! (And you can read more about Queermance at SameSame)

I also have an M/M short romance in the Queermance anthology, and I will be doing a reading for an F/F story that is slated to come out with Encounters/Clan Destine.

It’s a busy year full of all the love, it seems!

About the Talbott & Burns Mysteries

For two very smart men, Elliot Talbott and Jack Burns can be mighty slow: hell, it took them a decade to realise they were perfect for each other.

When they start an investigation business, mayhem naturally follows.

Looking for ghosts, witches and the paranormal, what they find is crooks, real life and a heap of trouble.

It’s a good thing they have each other as well.

About Homecoming

Jack Burns joined the army in the hope it would get his best friend out of his system. He’s been fighting wars for four years, and it didn’t work.

Jack leaves the army and returns to Melbourne, still secretly in love with Elliot Talbott – brilliant, mad, gorgeous Elliot – just as he’s been since they were fifteen. Elliot made it very clear, back then, that he wasn’t interested in dating anyone, boy or girl. He just wanted mad adventures with his best mate.

Jack’s okay with that. Really, he is. He’ll settle for being Elliot’s best mate and having home grown adventures in Elliot’s latest ridiculous scheme – Talbott and Burns Investigations. Problems Solved – Pests Eliminated  – Mysteries Unravelled!

And he’ll get right on with that – just as soon as he’s worked out why Elliot is missing, where he is and whether that last message means that Elliot and Jack have finally run out of time.

An extract from Homecoming

There was no light at all; not a glimmer. All Jack could hear was their breaths, loud and overwhelming after the creak and terrifyingly soft plmpfff of the tunnel filling with dirt.

“Jack,” said Elliot.

“Shut up,” Jack said sharply, “Save your air. Help’s coming.”

Please, God, let help be coming.

Jack felt Elliot’s breath ease from harsh panting to something trembling but relatively steady. So little space separated them, chests pressed so close together Jack fancied he could feel Elliot’s heart thudding. Elliot’s long, lanky form felt fragile under his sturdier physique. Jack had spent years in hot desert climates, spent desperately lonely nights, imagining Elliot’s body beneath him, over him, entwined with him, and now this was how it happened. Jack’s body an inadequate shield for his best friend, his secret love, and Jack wouldn’t mind dying so much if it meant Elliot would live, because it wasn’t supposed to happen like this or end like this.

Homecoming (A Talbott & Burns Mystery) is now available at:

Interview with a Pseudonym

I spoke recently to a fellow writer about how I’d branched out into erotic romance. He told me he’d written erotica too, under a pseudonym. This is what he has to say about the experience.

Angela V Mazzone

I have a bachelor’s degree  in psychology, a master’s degree in counselling, and – after a doctorate –   publications (in journals and a book – 1970-80s) all directed at psychology and gender issues. I retired  in 2000 and moved to Australia, after receiving (with writing colleagues) national short story awards in 2007 and 2008.

I was then inspired by writers like Norah Vincent (Self-Made Man: One Woman’s Year Disguised as a Man) and John Griffin (Black Like Me: The Definitive Griffin Estate Edition) – both taking risks to experience/understand gender and race issues – as well as writers publishing under assumed names, as all three Bronte sisters, Howard O’Brien as Ann Rice, Frank Baum as Edith Van Dyne, and Lucille Duplin as George Sand, I conceived a new challenge for myself: publish as a woman.

Less courageous than Ms Vincent or Mr Griffin, with a digital world at hand, I – as allowed on the Yahoo website – created an alias, Angela V. Mazzone. Then, responding to a 2010 call in the USA to add a chapter to an anthology of international first-experience-as-a-lesbian accounts, ‘Angela’ wrote and had accepted ‘her’ account of anxiety and uncertainty and eventual satisfaction having a two-sweet-girls’ lesbian experience in Australia.

An unlikely accomplishment – that small publication – gives me some satisfaction even today. The story is Girl on a Thursday in ‘I Kissed a Girl II’, edited by Regina Perry.

My prior university students, my daughters, and writing friends (in the USA, Australia and Brazil) have expressed both amused and admiring comments.

Unlike some other journalists, I have no plans to write under my own name about how I surfed the Web seeking to understand how women expressed themselves and sometimes – applying my professional skills as counselor – ‘Angela’ advising men and women in troubled relationships.

I did have a wealth of worldly-wise experiences at my command, however – such as (1) helping a young woman – who I thought suicidal – adjust; (2) following a respected man ‘of the cloth’ – a minister – express his hidden self; (3) encouraging a needing-of-attention, aging woman in Florida to feel better about herself; (4) advising a young (very intelligent) college-age woman in the UK about the sexual demands made on her by a boyfriend (happy outcome); and countless opportunities to console both men and women in marriages where matters were going south.

‘Angela’ did – I believe – good, without any harm.

While I’m quite happy with the discoveries made about the abstractions called men and women, and I am building them into a novel extolling the courage of women, Angela Victoria Mazzone – I’m sorry to tell anyone who might care – closed her counselling services two years go.

                                           – ‘Angie Mazzone’

Buy these books at Amazon:

What are your thoughts on ‘Angela’s experience, and pseudonyms in general? If you have any questions about pseudonyms, writer perspectives, gender issues or the like  for Angela, I’ll ask her to respond in the comments.