Tag Archives: lesbian

Publishing Roundup: lesbian romance, gay vampires, and Sherlock Holmes in Melbourne

The last few months have seen a few publishing milestones for me, so here’s a bit of a roundup before I resume my travel reports from the UK.

Gay Vampires: Ravenfall

While walking around on a self-guided tour of Roman London, I stumbled across this fantastic view of the Shard and London Bridge Hospital. The Hospital features in the bloody climax of my London-set paranormal thriller, Ravenfall.

The book is also a gay romance, with vampire James Sharpe trying to reclaim his humanity, with the help and love of the very human artist, Gabriel Dare. They might do well with that, provided they survive the plot in which James’s sire is involved.

Recent guest posts about Ravenfall:

Buy Ravenfall


Sherlock Holmes in Australia

I’ve written Holmes and Watson in Australia as a canon-era love story in The Adventure of the Colonial Boy – but I also write more traditional stories of them as epic best friends. I have stories in two sepearate anthologies, both set in Australia!

Sherlock Holmes: The Australian Casebook is coming out in November. My story, The Mystery of the Miner’s Wife, is set in Ballarat.

Baker Street Irregulars 2: The Game’s Afoot is due out in April 2018. It’s full of alternative universe interpretations of Sherlock Holmes. In my story, The Problem of the Three Journals, Holmes and Watson are contemporary Melburnian hipsters, running their cafe, The Sign of Four, and solving mysteries. The book is currently available for preorder:

Lesbian romance: Near Miss

Near Miss, set in Melbourne, is the story of a rock chick and a cool hairdresser who keep not quite meeting until a yarnbombing event intervenes. It came out in August.

I wrote about the story and yarnbombing for Women and Words: Creative Rebellion and Joyful Defiance.

You can get Near Miss at:

Interview with a Pseudonym

I spoke recently to a fellow writer about how I’d branched out into erotic romance. He told me he’d written erotica too, under a pseudonym. This is what he has to say about the experience.

Angela V Mazzone

I have a bachelor’s degree  in psychology, a master’s degree in counselling, and – after a doctorate –   publications (in journals and a book – 1970-80s) all directed at psychology and gender issues. I retired  in 2000 and moved to Australia, after receiving (with writing colleagues) national short story awards in 2007 and 2008.

I was then inspired by writers like Norah Vincent (Self-Made Man: One Woman’s Year Disguised as a Man) and John Griffin (Black Like Me: The Definitive Griffin Estate Edition) – both taking risks to experience/understand gender and race issues – as well as writers publishing under assumed names, as all three Bronte sisters, Howard O’Brien as Ann Rice, Frank Baum as Edith Van Dyne, and Lucille Duplin as George Sand, I conceived a new challenge for myself: publish as a woman.

Less courageous than Ms Vincent or Mr Griffin, with a digital world at hand, I – as allowed on the Yahoo website – created an alias, Angela V. Mazzone. Then, responding to a 2010 call in the USA to add a chapter to an anthology of international first-experience-as-a-lesbian accounts, ‘Angela’ wrote and had accepted ‘her’ account of anxiety and uncertainty and eventual satisfaction having a two-sweet-girls’ lesbian experience in Australia.

An unlikely accomplishment – that small publication – gives me some satisfaction even today. The story is Girl on a Thursday in ‘I Kissed a Girl II’, edited by Regina Perry.

My prior university students, my daughters, and writing friends (in the USA, Australia and Brazil) have expressed both amused and admiring comments.

Unlike some other journalists, I have no plans to write under my own name about how I surfed the Web seeking to understand how women expressed themselves and sometimes – applying my professional skills as counselor – ‘Angela’ advising men and women in troubled relationships.

I did have a wealth of worldly-wise experiences at my command, however – such as (1) helping a young woman – who I thought suicidal – adjust; (2) following a respected man ‘of the cloth’ – a minister – express his hidden self; (3) encouraging a needing-of-attention, aging woman in Florida to feel better about herself; (4) advising a young (very intelligent) college-age woman in the UK about the sexual demands made on her by a boyfriend (happy outcome); and countless opportunities to console both men and women in marriages where matters were going south.

‘Angela’ did – I believe – good, without any harm.

While I’m quite happy with the discoveries made about the abstractions called men and women, and I am building them into a novel extolling the courage of women, Angela Victoria Mazzone – I’m sorry to tell anyone who might care – closed her counselling services two years go.

                                           – ‘Angie Mazzone’

Buy these books at Amazon:

What are your thoughts on ‘Angela’s experience, and pseudonyms in general? If you have any questions about pseudonyms, writer perspectives, gender issues or the like  for Angela, I’ll ask her to respond in the comments.